Events

Cultural Heritage Informatics--Turning the Page, Writing the Code: Digital Museum Networks and Collaborative Museology in Canada
Monday, September 15; 10 a.m.
Herman B Wells Library, Room E174

How are Indigenous communities, museum professionals, and technology designers working together to re-shape possibilities for their associations and collaborations? How are new networked memory institutions responding to shifting political and ethical terrain for curation and media production in the digital age? In this talk, Kate Hennessy, an Assistant Professor specializing in Media at Simon Fraser University's School of Interactive Arts and Technology (SIAT), will explore these questions through the lens of virtual exhibit projects that she has designed and produced in collaboration with Canadian Aboriginal communities, museums, and scholars in the last decade. She will discuss productive responses to controversies over cultural representation, unequal relations of power, and legacies of colonialism and how they can be traced in new digital museum networks that prioritize the building of relationships with Aboriginal communities and the generation of new knowledge that might avoid mere reproduction of colonial collecting practices. The lecture is free and open to the public and part of the Cultural Heritage Informatics lecture series, organized in conjunction with the joint Digital Infrastructure Planning for OVPR Cultural Heritage Collections project of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, with support from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University.


National Hispanic Heritage Month Reception
Monday, September 15; 4-6 p.m.
Come help us celebrate the beginning of National Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15-October 15). The reception will be free and open to the public, and sponsored by the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Office of International Services, Latino Studies, La Casa, El Centro Comunal Latino, and City of Bloomington Latino Outreach Program.


Lotus in the Park (at Waldron, Hill, Buskirk Park)
Saturday, September 20; Noon-5 p.m.
Join staff and volunteers from the MMWC at the annual free Lotus in the Park, celebrating music and crafts from around the world. This year we'll make masks, and kazoos to take home, and paint "houses" in the Ghananian style known as bambɔlse as part of a community art project.


Speaking of Food--The Real Homeland Security: Sustaining the People and Places of Local Food
Friday, October 3; Noon
Jennifer Meta Robinson, a Professor of Practice in Communication and Culture at Indiana University Bloomington, will speak about the current popularity of local food across the nation and the innovative developments in the Bloomington area for making local food available to local consumers. She will address the idea that a food system, however, is not a one-way conduit from fields to tables but a reciprocal relationship-economic, social, and place-based-that invites those who enjoy eating local food to help secure the lives of those who grow it. Using photos and life stories of small farmers in Southern Indiana, she will focus on the major challenges that growers face in providing local food and how customers can strengthen local food systems in our area. The free public lecture is part of Speaking of Food, a lecture series presented in conjunction with, and sponsored by, Themester 2014's "Eat, Drink, Think: Food from Art to Science," an initiative of the IU College of Arts and Sciences.


Cultural Heritage Informatics--Cite Level Analysis: How the Digital Index of North American Archaeology Joins Incompatible Databases for Research and Outreach
Monday, October 13; 10 a.m.
Herman B Wells Library, Hazelbaker Lecture Hall, Room E159

Joshua J. Wells, an Assistant Professor at Indiana University South Bend, with joint appointments between the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, and the Department of Informatics, will speak on the Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA), a Web-based project that integrates archaeological data from different sources through the implementation of linked open data (LOD). LOD and data integration are one of the most important opportunities currently available for researchers in any sector, and for cross-disciplinary collaborations throughout the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. However, making data interoperable for such work is challenging both practically and theoretically, and requires that investigators overcome a series of methodological and conceptual hurdles to accomplish their goals. DINAA's goal is to integrate non-sensitive definitional information about archaeological sites from governmentally produced and curated databases. These combined information sets form an index through which archaeological researchers can communicate and query disciplinary knowledge about the past, making archived data, physical collections, and documentation more readily discoverable through spatial, temporal, and cultural contexts that more accurately represent their origins than a general purpose search engine. DINAA does not store the work of other researchers, it cites that work through LOD standards and provides users with the necessary linkages or citation information to access what data they may in order to further investigate the archaeological past and use them in combination with data from other disciplines. Through DINAA, Wells researches interoperability issues between large-scale archaeological databases for heritage management, to promote broad archaeological data reusability in open science. Dr. Wells sits on the editorial board of OpenContext.org, a NSF-recognized resource for Web-based publication of primary archaeological data. He has consulted on big data, open science issues for governmental research and policy groups in Australia, North America, and the European Union. The lecture is free and open to the public and part of the Cultural Heritage Informatics lecture series, organized in conjunction with the joint Digital Infrastructure Planning for OVPR Cultural Heritage Collections project of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, with support from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University.


Speaking of Food--"Your Grandmother Relied on Guess-work": Fear, Technology, and Authoritative Knowledge in Home Canning Discourse
Friday, October 17; Noon
Danille Christensen, from Ohio State University's Center for Folklore Studies, and an IU alumna, will speak on her upcoming book, Freedom from Want, a cultural history on "how and why some home canning has been promoted by individuals with diverse agendas in the 20th century United States." The free public lecture is part of Speaking of Food, a lecture series presented in conjunction with, and sponsored by, Themester 2014's "Eat, Drink, Think: Food from Art to Science," an initiative of the IU College of Arts and Sciences.


Cultural Heritage Informatics--From Display to Dialogue: Case Studies of Collaborative Methods in Interactive Media for Museums
Monday, October 20; 10 a.m.
Herman B Wells Library, Hazelbaker Lecture Hall, Room E159

Adrian Van Allen is an artist, designer, and anthropologist who has created exhibits and web sites for the Exploratorium, NASA, the Smithsonian, UC Berkeley, and the Cleveland Museum of Art. During this presentation she'll explore how collaboration has emerged in recent decades as a key concern for a broad range of academic disciplines and cultural institutions. As anthropology and public museums have searched for methods to integrate different kinds of knowledge from their source communities into exhibits and collections, the forms of collaboration and the kinds of representations they produce have correspondingly shifted. A similar shift from "display" to "dialogue" can also be charted within a series of institutional multimedia projects she created between 2006 and 2014. Case studies presented will include 'Evidence: How Do We Know What We Know?' for the Exploratorium, 'Digital Nineveh Archives' with UC Berkeley and the Iraqi Department of Antiquities, 'Ars Synthetica' with the Synthetic Biology Research Center (SynBerc) and Paul Rabinow, and 'Crafting Nature' a collaboration between Van Allen and scientists at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History during her dissertation fieldwork. Across these projects she'll examine how collaboration is conceptualized by participants, how the roles of stakeholders change through the development, design, and production processes, and how different perspectives can be leveraged to provide insight into the production of scientific knowledge such as archeological histories, narratives of human origins, and emerging synthetic biology techniques. The lecture is free and open to the public and part of the Cultural Heritage Informatics lecture series, organized in conjunction with the joint Digital Infrastructure Planning for OVPR Cultural Heritage Collections project of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, with support from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University.


Speaking of Food--Açaí From Local to Global
Friday, October 24; Noon
Eduardo Brondizio, Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University Bloomington, and Andrea Siqueira, Visiting Lecturer in International Studies Program at Indiana University Bloomington, will discuss their work surrounding the açaí berry (both are serving as curators of Açaí From Local to Global). Their presentation will describe the continuing role of the açaí berry for the Caboclo people of Brazil, building upon their research into açaí's global market expansion, and how that expansion is affecting the forest farmers who grow and supply the fruit. The free public lecture is part of Speaking of Food, a lecture series presented in conjunction with, and sponsored by, Themester 2014's "Eat, Drink, Think: Food from Art to Science," an initiative of the IU College of Arts and Sciences.


Halloween Family Fun Fest--Monsters
Sunday, October 26; 2-4 p.m.
The MMWC's annual Halloween celebration looks at monsters from around the world. Come learn about them, and make crafts and play games to scare the monsters away! Halloween Family Fun Fest is free and open to the public.


Cultural Heritage Informatics--Getting There: Building an Online Research Community
Monday, October 27; 10 a.m.
Herman B Wells Library, Hazelbaker Lecture Hall, Room E159

Nicholas Jakobsen and Ryan Wallace, co-founders of Culture Code (culture.ca), a software consulting company specializing in the development of cultural and research-focused web applications, will discuss the Reciprocal Research Network (RRN). The RRN is an online research environment codeveloped by the Musqueam Indian Band, the Stó:lo Nation/Stó:lo Tribal Council, the U'mista Cultural Society, and the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia. It provides access to Northwest Coast items from 22 different partner institutions around the world, enabling geographically dispersed users and institutions including originating communities, academics and museum staff to carry out individual or collaborative cultural heritage research projects. Diverse user groups share their own perspectives and knowledge with the people and institutions that make up the RRN community. To date, almost 1,800 people have joined the RRN and collectively contributed over 3,000 discussions, projects, and pieces of shared knowledge. This vibrant community helped the RRN win the Gold Muse Award for Best Digital Community from the American Association of Museums in 2012. During development, the RRN team explored and tested methods to overcome challenges commonly faced by museums undertaking similar projects. Jakobsen and Wallace will discuss how the RRN is affecting research, why it is having this effect, and what course the development process followed. The lecture, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Cultural Heritage Informatics lecture series, organized in conjunction with the joint Digital Infrastructure Planning for OVPR Cultural Heritage Collections project of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, with support from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University. The lecture is free and open to the public and part of the Cultural Heritage Informatics lecture series, organized in conjunction with the joint Digital Infrastructure Planning for OVPR Cultural Heritage Collections project of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures and the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, with support from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University.


Speaking of Food--Coffee Ties the World Together (and Why Your Coffee Choices Matter)
Friday, October 31; Noon
Most adults in the USA drink coffee at least occasionally, but few know much about coffee's social, economic, and environmental impacts. Globally, coffee is one of the world's most valuable commodities, but it is produced by some of the poorest people. It has little nutritional value, yet it dominates some of the planet's most fertile and lush landscapes, and many consumers consider it to be the most important element of their breakfast. These contradictions have spurred the growth of fair trade and certifications for coffee, and have also drawn attention to inequities and conundrums of international trade relationships. This presentation, by Catherine Tucker, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University Bloomington, will explore some of coffee's contradictions, the ways that coffee production and consumption connects disparate peoples and places, and the implications raised for social, economic and environmental sustainability. The free public lecture is part of Speaking of Food, a lecture series presented in conjunction with, and sponsored by, Themester 2014's "Eat, Drink, Think: Food from Art to Science," an initiative of the IU College of Arts and Sciences.


Family Craft Day--Making Music
Sunday, November 16; 2-3:30 p.m.
Come join us for this free, fun, and sustainable event and make harmonicas, drums, and other musical instruments out of household objects (bring an empty soda or water bottle to make your own maraca!).


WinterFest--Creating Cookbooks and Other Gifts
Sunday, December 7; 2-3:30 p.m.
Bring your favorite recipes and we'll help you turn them into a special cookbook to be given as a gift this holiday season. While you are here we'll also work on other gift-worthy crafts during this free public event.